RTFB

Biology, Eighth Edition, by Campbell & Reece, et al.

Biology, Eighth Edition, by Campbell & Reece, et al.

For those of you unfamiliar, RTFB stands for “READ THE FUCKING BOOK”. We had a Biology quiz today, and I totally blew two questions because I didn’t RTFB.

The first question, and how I answered it:

This Molecule Doesnt Make Sense

This Molecule Doesn't Make Sense

I recognized that there was a problem, and couldn’t work it out. Looking at it, obviously the H atom is making too many bonds here, winding up with too many e- in its valence shell. What I didn’t do was read the instructions for the problem thoroughly, which offered the option of saying the molecule didn’t make sense. I could SEE it didn’t make sense, and why, but didn’t write down that this was the case.

Those instructions appeared in the book, from whence the problem came, but not on the quiz sheet which said something like “Draw the Lewis Dot Diagrams for problem 9 on page 36” or whatever.

There was a similarly nonsensical molecule, that I also did not label as such.

Damnit, Damnit, Damnit.

RTFB.

drekshunz

From whence came the art:

The first image is of our textbook, Biology, Eighth Edition, by Campbell & Reese et al.

Other images by me and are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution- NonCommercial- Share Alike 3.0 License.

Blogging My Biology Class 20080829

Biology, Eighth Edition, by Campbell & Reece, et al.

Biology, Eighth Edition, by Campbell & Reece, et al.

My notes and thoughts from Biology 111, for Friday, August 29, 2008. The entire series can be found here.

Forgive the delay, but I’ve had a ton of stuff to work on.

On Friday, we started out with a review of covalent bonding. Doc re-stressed that in covalent bonding, atoms are sharing one or more pairs of electrons.

Let’s take another look at our covalent bonding notation:

Bonding Notation for Oxygen and Nitrogen

Bonding Notation for Oxygen and Nitrogen

Now note that the two Oxygens share two pairs of e- and the two Nitrogens share three pairs of e-, as noted by the lines and by the dots between them. Also note that in the Lewis Dot diagram, all valence e- are depicted, regardless of whether they are involved in the bonding.

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Blogging My Biology Class 20080827

Biology, Eighth Edition, by Campbell & Reece, et al.

Biology, Eighth Edition, by Campbell & Reece, et al.

My notes and thoughts from Biology 111, for Wednesday, August 27, 2008. The entire series can be found here.

Wednesday’s lecture began with a review of atomic structure, including a reminder that our e * diagrams are 2D representations of 3D space.

Then we moved on to some more basic chemistry.

We focused mostly on electrons, and will continue to, as electrons are what determines reactivity of an atom, and reactivity is what’s really vital to biology.

e orbits are called e shells or energy levels. Each e orbital can hold up to 2 e.

The first energy level has one orbital, because it’s so small, and electrons, having all the same negative electrical charge, repel each other.

The second and third energy levels each contain 4 orbitals, each energy level then is capable of holding 8 e (2 e in each orbital).

Then doc talked about how electrons fill from the innermost energy level, out.

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Blogging My Biology Class 20080825

Biology, Eighth Edition, by Campbell & Reece, et al.

Biology, Eighth Edition, by Campbell & Reece, et al.

My notes and thoughts from Biology 111, for Monday, August 25, 2008. The entire series can be found here.

We began Monday’s lecture where we left off on Friday (which is always a good place to start). Doc put the tree of life back up on the white board, and we did a quick review of what we went over on Friday regarding inheritance and emergence.

We then began to work a bit on Natural Selection, using Salmon as an example.

Natural Selection

Variation
within a
Population
+ Heredity + Differential
Reproductive
Success*
= Natural Selection

*Individuals with certain traits produce more offspring than those with other traits.

Doc stressed that Natural Selection works at the Population level, and not at the individual level. It’s important to stress this, as it’s the beginning of the explanation of why dogs don’t give birth to cats, that tired old moronic Creationist standby.

(Continued Below the Fold)

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